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Health Care and Insurance News Bulletins 

January 24, 2017 – February 8, 2017

The purpose of this bulletin is to compile a handful of articles relating to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) that are most pertinent to LIUNA and its health and welfare funds. We hope you find this biweekly bulletin helpful and informative.

Trump can do plenty on his own to unravel Obama health care law
President Donald Trump can do plenty on his own to unravel the Obama health care law, but some of those actions would create disruptions that undermine his administration's early promises. Other less sweeping steps could open the way for big changes, but might not get as much notice.

Health Law Coverage Has Helped Many Chronically Ill — But Has Still Left Gaps
As President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress devise a plan to replace the 2010 health law, new research suggests a key component of the law helped people with chronic disease get access to health care — though, the paper notes, it still fell short in meeting their medical needs.

Beyond Obamacare—How Trump and Price will disrupt the health care system
Tom Price faced off with the Senate during his recent confirmation hearing for the role of Secretary of Health and Human Services in the Trump cabinet. But he's been laying the groundwork for what he sees as the future of health care since 2015.

For Conservatives, A New Day In Health Care
Despite heated congressional hearings on whether Rep. Tom Price should head the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, President Donald Trump’s promise to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act is already in motion.

STATES IN THE NEWS

Could California go it alone with Obamacare? How much are you willing to pay?
How much would Californians be willing to spend to keep Obamacare in the Golden State? That’s a question lawmakers might be asking residents in the months to come as President Donald Trump and the Republican Congress scurry to repeal the Affordable Care Act and scramble for a plan to replace it.

King County officials, patients push to salvage health-care law
Emily Kight, of Seattle, was diagnosed with a rare form of aggressive breast tumor at age 27. Her job didn’t offer health insurance, she said. Then she lost her job.

Why Kentucky Couldn’t Kill Obamacare: A Lesson for Congress
As congressional Republicans meet this week to gut Barack Obama’s signature health-care law, they can look for guidance to Kentucky, where a big political promise met with reality to force the type of compromise national lawmakers might face.

Obamacare enrollment up in Maryland, despite uncertainty
Amid uncertainty about the future of the national health care law, record numbers of Marylanders signed up for coverage this year, according to figures released by the state Wednesday.